Grafting    begins    with    a    cut.                  

 

The    scion    that    will    be    implanted    is    cut    form    one    context    and    transferred    to    another,    where    it    is    hoped    that    adjoined    edges    can    find    fusion. This    publication    presents    the    thread    of    a    piece    of    work,    conceived    in    studio    for    a    specific    site    of    installation    but,    because    of    the    inexorable advance    of    a    virus,    subsequently    grafted    into    another    context:    that    of    the    landscape    within    a    kilometre    of    my    home.  

 

The    French    literary    theorist    Jacques    Derrida    -    who    has    himself    deployed    grafting    as    a    thematic,    aesthetic    and    poetic    modality    in    his  writing   -    reminds    me    that    “there    is    no    out-of-context”.    The    unplanned    context    of    the    landscape    into    which    this    piece    was    grafted    (salt  and  tape    woven    directly    onto    rock    face    and    forest    floor)    in    turn    embedded    the    work    with    unexpected    accretions,    material    and    immaterial.    The geometric,    methodical    structure    of    the    weave    is    infused    with    the    organic,    grounded    in    the    earth:    a    graft    of    text    and    context.    

Grafting    involves    such    exchange,    such    inter-action    between    merged    bodies,    in    a    variable    and    contingent    process,    that    it    can    yield    unlikely  encounters.    In    the    context    of    this    publication,    the    later    images    of    the    work    also    enact    an    exchange    in    their    apposition, their    chiral    and    achiral    mirroring,    suggestive    perhaps    of    autografts   -    or    grafts    upon    grafts:    an    unfolding    inter-textual    weave.